Blogs

Traditions

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Thousands of years of skill exist on the points and edges of our tools. Next time you use a tool, imagine how many others came before you. You must realize you belong to a vast tribe that encompasses the entire world. Know that you are one of the fortunate, to be able to use your hands to create and enrich the lives of others. Learn well. From your hands to other’s hands. Teach well.
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Ambassadors for the Future

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Quick Start Ambassador Find a local Woodwork Career Alliance teacher, or make one. Volunteer to sit at the computer with them to get them started. Follow up to see evaluations are being done as part of regular teaching. Offer plant tours or guest lecture about job opportunities. The payoff is in the future, not necessary immediately. That said: Conduct Real Job Interviews. Teach them how to prepare for an interview and job search. Could this be a project for AWI Past Presidents and all Honorary Life Members?
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Proud and Humbled 2015

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I'm old. Not Old-Old, but still it's been a long road. Today I grin from ear to ear as I talk with my colleagues about the future of advanced wood manufacturing. Patrick Molzahn has updated this venerable classic to really be MODERN woodworking. This text and all the supporting materials published this year by Goodheart-Willcox is the foundation document for instructors, team leaders, production managers, and everyone who wants to increase their working knowledge of the industry. What a privilege to live at this time in history.
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Why Finish?

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Moisture Wood is hygroscopic. It tends to absorb moisture from the air. Wood used for furniture and architectural woodwork is dried to a moisture content of between 6-10%, which is to say that less than 10% of the weight of the wood is water. That small percentage is bound up in the cell walls. One of the reasons we finish wood products is to retard the cells from taking on moisture. In the case of a table top, a finish helps prevent permanent damage to the table if the spill is wiped up quickly. Most finishes are not strong enough to fully prevent the taking on and giving off of moisture as the wood tries to come to equilibrium with the relative...
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The Myth of Thickness

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The Myth of Thickness Some think a thicker veneer will stand up better to use or be easier to repair if damaged. While this line of thought is logical, it is not usually true in the case of fine woodworking. It is a rare piece of veneered woodwork which is not protected by a finishing process of some sort; one which applies multiple coats of a clear or opaque (and very durable) finish over the veneer and substrate. It is this finish which protects the woodwork, and usually this finish which is touched up or repaired in the case of abrasion. Should the woodwork suffer such severe abuse that the finish is compromised, and the wood fibers...
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I always enjoy getting out of my office and spending time with woodworkers and design professionals. For me, that is the opportunity to see the impact of the Architectural Woodwork Standards in production, installation, and ultimately architectural woodwork in final use by the owner. I am privileged to have a unique perspective as a former inspector, compliance auditor, inspections manager, and now technical services manager. I have seen projects that are stellar examples of craftsmanship and compliance with the contract documents….and I have seen almost all possible scenarios of how things can go wrong. With that in mind, I pose the question;...
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